Cowboy Dances

A collection of Traditional Western Square Dances By Lloyd Shaw

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THE FRAMEWORK
157
(20)   Ending:
Hurry up, boys, and don't be sloiv, Meet your pard' with a double elbow.
(Explanation: This is an additional call, only given when they are finishing the grand right and left of any of the preceding calls. It adds a more complicated figure.
As each gentleman meets his partner, instead of prome­nading, they hook right elbows and swing around to the right for two counts, then hook left elbows and go to the left for four counts, usually with a high springing step. Each man then advances to the next girl and hooks right elbows with her and then left elbows. Then to the next lady whom he. "double elbows" and so on back to his own lady with whom he promenades.
To count it carefully and keep everyone together in their changes it is necessary to allow two extra, counts, one while changing from the right elbow to the left elbow with each girl and the other while changing from one girl to the next. The count then becomes one, two, change (elbows), one, two, three, four, change (girls). Once this pattern is established it is easier to do it all to the count of eight for each girl.
In some communities they count four with the right elbow, four with the left elbow, two for the change. This unfortunately gets the whole count off of the four bar basis. It is sometimes called:
Change your pards and don't be slow, Swing 'em all with the double elbow.
(21)   Ending:
Watch your honey and watch her close, Treat your honey to a double dose! Swing 'em high and swing 'em loiv. Keep on stuingin' that calico! Right foot up and left foot down, Whirligig, Whirligig, Whirligig 'round! Rope your cow and brand your calf, Swing your honey an hour and a half! Here I come with the old mess wagon, Hind wheel broke and the axle draggin'. Meet your honey and pat 'er on the head, If she don't like biscuit give her cornbread! Promenade, boys, promenade!






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III