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Hit's the old Ship of Zion, the old Ship of Zion, Hit's the old Ship of Zion, as she comes.
She'll be loaded with bright angels when she comes, etc.
Oh, brothers, what will you do when she comes? etc.
We will flee to the rocks and the mountains, etc.
Repetition carried to a point of wearisomeness is a fa­vorite form of revival hymns:
Some have fathers up in glory, Some have fathers up in glory, Some have fathers up in glory, On the other shore.
Some bright day we'll go and see them, Some bright day we'll go and see them, Some bright day we'll go and see them, On the other bright shore.
Oh, just let me in the kingdom,
Oh, just let me in the kingdom,
Oh, just let me in the kingdom,
When this world's at an end.
Here a feeling for the supernatural is uppermost. The oddly changing keys, the endings that leave the ear in ex­pectation of something to follow, the quavers and falsettos, become in recurrence a haunting hint of the spirit world; neither beneficent nor maleficent, neither devil nor angel, but something—something not to be understood, yet to be certainly apprehended. It is to the singer as if he stood within a sorcerer's circle, crowded upon by an invisible throng.
Rain, Mighty Lord
Rain, oh, rain, mighty Saviour, Rain converting power down, Rain, mighty Lord.
The way the holy prophets went, Rain, mighty Saviour,
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III