Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 7 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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260 THE DUEL OF WHARTON AND STUART.
marked betwixt the copies, lies in the dialect, and in some modifications applicable to Scotland; as, using the words "our Scottish Knight." The black-letter ballad, in like manner, terms Wharton "our Eng­lish Knight."
In this connection we may mention another ballad founded on a duel—Sir Niel and Mac Van, in Bu-chan's larger collection, ii. 16. A stall copy is called Sir Neil and Glengyle.
PART FIRST.
It grieveth me to tell you o'
Near London late what did befall, 'Twixt two young gallant gentlemen;
It grieveth me, and ever shall.
One of them was Sir George Wharton,                    *
My good Lord Wharton's son and heir;
The other, James Stuart, a Scottish knight, One that a valiant heart did bear.
When first to court these nobles came,
One night, a-gaming, fell to words,                         ro
And in their fury grew so hot, That they did both try their keen swords.
10. Sir George Wharton was quarrelsome at cards; a tem­per which he exhibited so disagreeably when playing with the Earl of Pembroke, that the Earl told him, " Sir George, I have loved you long; but by your manner in playing, you lay it upon me either to leave to love you, or to leave to play with you; wherefore choosing to love you still, I will never play with you any more."—Lodge's Illustrations, vol. iii. p. 350. Scott.







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