Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 7 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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THE JOVIAL HUNTER OF BROMSGROVE. 147
It's just as my sword and thy neck can agree, For I am a jovial hunter."
Then into his long locks the wild woman flew,
Wind well thy horn, good hunter; Till she thought in her heart to tear him through, m
Though he was a jovial hunter.
Then Sir Ryalas drawed his broad sword again,
Wind well Ay horn, good hunter; And he fairly split her head into twain,
For he was a jovial hunter.                                          «o
In Bromsgrove church, the knight he doth lie,
Wind well thy horn, good hunter; And the wild boar's head is pictured thereby,
Sir Ryalas, the jovial hunter.
THE BLUDY SEEK.
The. Bludy Serb, both story and morality, is taken from the Gesta Romanorum; see two forms of the tale in Madden's Old English Versions, &c. p. 22, p. 404.
This poem is preserved in the Bannatyne Manu­script, and has been several times printed. The pres­ent copy is from Laing's Select Remains of the Ancient .Popular Poetry of Scotland. The author is Robert Henryson, whose ballad of Robene and Makyne has %een given in the fourth volume of this collection.







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