Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 7 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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THE TUKNAMENT OF TOTENHAM. 109
Have I twyse or thrise riden thruz the rowte, In what place that I come, of me thei shall ha[ve] doute. Myn armys bene so clere: I bar a ridell and a rake, Poudurt with the brenyng drake,                      iu
And thre cantels of a cake In ilke a cornere."
" I make a vow," quod Tirry, " and swere be my
crede, Saw thu never yong boy forther his body bede : Ffor when thei fyzt fastest, and most er in drede, I shalle take Tib be the hond and away hir lede.                                                               m
Then byn myn armys best: I ber a pilch of ermyn, Poudert with a catt skyn; The chefe is of pechmyn,                                   12*
That stondis on the creste."
" I make a vow," quod Dudman, " and swere be
the stra, Whils me ys left my mer, thu gets hir not swa.
122-126. Here stand v. 104-108 in MS. Harl.
128. Whyls me ys left my merth. MS. Harl.
Whil I am most mery. Wright.
We must obviously read " mer," i. e. mare, with Percy and Eitson; otherwise the rest of the stanza is nonsense. The (ft which is added in the MS. Harl., was caught from the thou following.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III