Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 7 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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THE BATTLE OF SHERIFF-SIUIR.          157
Dialogue between Will Lick-Ladle and Tom Clean-Cogue, &c, written by the Eev. John Barclay of Edinburgh, many years after the event: and The Bat­tle of Sherramoor, altered and abridged by Burns from this last, for Johnson's Museum, (p. 290.) See Appendix.
There's some say that we wan, and some say that they wan, And some say that nane wan at a', man; But one thing I'm sure, that at Sherra-muir
A battle there was that I saw, man. And we ran, and they ran, and they ran, and we ran,                                                                 «
But Florence ran fastest of a', man.
Argyle and Belhaven, not frighted like Leven;
Which Rothes and Haddington saw, man; For they all, with Wightman, advanc'd on the right, man, "While others took flight, being raw, man. 10 And we ran, fyc.
Lord Roxburgh was there, in orher to share With Douglas, who stood not in awe, man;
6. Florence was the Marquis of Huntly's horse. Hogg.
7-10. Lord Belhaven, the Earl of Leven, and the Earls of Eothes and Haddington, who all bore arms as volunteers in the royal army. Major-General Joseph Wightman, who com­manded the centre of the royal army.
11-14. John, fifth Duke of Roxburgh, a loyal volunteer.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III