Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 7 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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THE BATTLE OF OTTERBOUKNE.           23
When Percy wi' the Douglas met,
I wat he was fu' fain; They swakked their swords, till sair they swat,
And the blood ran down like rain.
But Percy with his good broad sword,                  sa
That could so sharply wound, Has wounded Douglas on the brow,
Till he fell to the ground.
Then he call'd on his little foot-page,
And saidó" Run speedilie,                                  90
And fetch my ain dear sister's son,
Sir Hugh Montgomery.
" My nephew good," the Douglas said,
" "What recks the death of ane! Last night I dream'd a dreary dream,                   aa
And I ken the day's thy ain.
" My wound is deep; I fain would sleep;
Take thou the vanguard of the three, And hide me by the braken bush,
That grows on yonder lilye lee.                          100
" O bury me by the braken bush,
Beneath the blooming brier, Let never living mortal ken
That ere a kindly Scot lies here."