Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 6 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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THE FIRE OF FRENDRAUGHT.           173
As they cam in at Evan-head,
At Ricklaw-holm they spread abread;
" Drive on, my lads! it will be late;                     n
We'll hae a pint at Wamphray gate.
" For where'er I gang, or e'er I ride,
The lads of Wamphray are on my side;
And of a' the lads that I do ken,
A Wamphray lad's the king of men."                   so
THE FIRE OF FRENDRAUGHT.
From Motherwell's Minstrelsy, p. 161.
"A mortal feud having arisen between the Laird of Frendraught [Sir James Chrichton] and the Laird of Rothiemay [William Gordon], both gentlemen of Banffshire, a rencontre took place, at which the re­tainers of both were present, on the 1st of January, 1630 ; when Rothiemay was killed, and several per­sons hurt on both sides. To stanch this bloody quarrel, the Marquis of Huntly, who was chief to both parties, and who had therefore a right to act as arbiter be­tween them, ordered Frendraught to pay fifty thousand merks to Rothiemay's widow. In the ensuing Sep­tember, Frendraught fell into another quarrel, in the course of which James Lesly, son to Lesly of Pitcaple, was shot through the arm. Soon after the last inci-
74-76. Kicklaw-holm is a place upon the Evan-water, which falls into the Annan, below Moffat. Wamphray-gate was in those days an alehouse.—S.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III