Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 6 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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138 THE EAID OF THE BEIDSTVTRE.
Three, on they laid weel at the last.            »•
Except the horsemen of the guard,
If I could put men to availe,
None stoutlier stood out for their laird,
Nor did the lads of Liddisdail.
But little harness had we there;                       
But auld Badreule had on a jack, And did right weel, I you declare,
"With all his Trumbills at his back.
Gude Edderstane was not to lack, Nor Kirktoun, Newton, noble men!                  i»>
Thir's all the specials I of speake, By others that I could not ken.
Who did invent that day of play, "We need not fear to find him soon;
the Jed and Teviot. Hundlie.—Rutherford of Hundlie, or Hundalee, situated on the Jed above Jedburgh. HuntMll.— The old tower of Hunthill was situated about a mile above Jedburgh. It was the patrimony of an ancient family of Rutherfords. I suppose the person, here meant, to be the same who is renowned in tradition by the name of the Cock of MunihilL—S.
146. Sir Andrew Turnbull of Bedrule, upon Rule Water. —S.
149.  An ancient family of Rutherfords; I believe, indeed, the most ancient now extant—S.
150.  The parish of Kirktoun belonged, I believe, about this time, to a branch of the Cavers family j but Kirkton of Stewartfield is mentioned in the list of Border clans in 1597. Newton.—This is probably Grinyslaw of Little Newton, men­tioned in the said roll of Border clans.—S.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III