Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 6 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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134 THE KAID OF THE KEIDSWIRE.
"We saw, come marching ower the knows, s Five hundred Fennicks in a flock,—•
With jack and speir, and bows all bent, And warlike weapons at their will:
Although we were na weel content,
Yet, by my troth, we fear'd no ill.                 »
Some gaed to drink, and some stude still,
And some to cards and dice them sped ; Till on ane Farnstein they fyled a bill,
And he was fugitive and fled.
Carmichaell bade them speik out plainlie, & And cloke no cause for ill nor good;
The other, answering him as vainlie, Began to reckon kin and blood : He raise, and raxed him where he stood,
And bade him match him with his marrows; ro Then Tindaill heard them reasun rude,
And they loot off a flight of arrows.
Then was there nought but bow and speir,
And every man pull'd out a brand; "A Schafton and a Fenwick " thare :                 ts
Gude Symington was slain frae hand.
The Scotsmen cried on other to stand, Frae time they saw John Robson slain—
What should they cry? the King's command Could cause no cowards turn again.                   »
66. The Fenwicks; a powerful and numerous Northum­berland clan.—S.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III