Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 5 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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THE PLATE OP EOBTN HODE.           427
But thou semest a noughty knave.
Thou callest me cuckolde by my name,
And I swere by god and saynt John                             iro
Wyfe had I never none.
This cannot I denye,
But if thou be a good felowe,
I wil sel mi horse, mi harneis, pottes and paniers to,
Thou shalt have the one halfe and I will have the
other; If thou be not so content, Thou shalt have stripes, if thou were my brother.
BOBTN HODE.
Harke, potter, what I shall say: This seven yere and more thou hast used this way, Yet were thou never so curteous to me,                       iw
As one penny passage to paye.
THE POTTER.
Why should I pay passage to thee ?
KOBTN HODE.
For I am Robyn Hode, chiefe gouernoure Under the grene woode tree.
THE POTTEK.
This seven yere have I used this way up and downe,
Yet payed I passage to no man,
Nor now I wyl not beginne, so do the worst thou can.
KOBYN HODE.
Passage shalt thou pai here under the grene-wode tre, Or els thou shalt leve a wedde with me.
THE POTTER.
If thou be a good felowe, as men do the call,              iw
Laye awaye thy bowe,
187, to do, C.; to or so omitted in W. 189, wedded, C, wed, W.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III