Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 5 of 8 from 1860 edition - online book

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KOSE THE EED AND WHITE LILLIE. 399
" And we will cut our green claithing A little aboon our knee ;                                         to
And we will on to gude greenwood, Twa bauld bowmen to be."
" Ohon, alas !" said White Lillie,
" My fingers are but sma'. And tho' my hands wou'd wield the bow,              7j
They winna yield at a'."
" O had your tongue now, White Lillie,
And lat these fears a' be ; There's naething that ye're awkward in
But I will learn thee."                                            so
Then they are on to gude greenwood
As fast as gang cou'd they; O then they spied him, Robin Hood,
Below a green aik tree.
" Gude day, gude day, kind sir," they said, u
" God make you safe and free." " Gude day, gude day," said Robin Hood,
" What is your wills wi' me ? "
"Lo here we are, twa banish'd knights,
Come frae our "native hame;                                 so
We're come to crave o' thee service, Our king will gie us nane."
"If ye be twa young banish'd knights,
Tell me frae what eountrie ;" " Frae Anster town into Fifeshire,                          9j
Ye know it as well as we."







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III