Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 4 of 8 from 1860 edition -online book

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172 THE BLIND BEGGAR'S DAUGHTER
" And there did young Mbnford with a blow on
the face Lose both his eyes in a very short space ;              m
His life had been gone away with his sight, Had not a young woman gone forth in the night.
" Among the slain men, her fancy did move To search and to seek for her own true love, Who seeing young Monford there gasping to die, ss She saved his life through her charity.
"And then all our victuals in beggars attire,
At the hands of good people we then did require;
At last into England, as now it is seen,
We came, and remained in BednaU Green. 100
" And thus we have lived in Fortune's despyght, Though poor, yet contented, with humble delight, And in my old years, a comfort to me, God sent me a daughter, called pretty Bessee.
"And thus, ye nobles, my song I do end,               105
Hoping by the same no man to offend; Full forty long winters thus I have been, A silly blind beggar of BednaU Green."
Now when the company every one Did hear the strange tale he told in his song, 110 They were amazed, as well as they might be, Both at the blind beggar and pretty Bessee. S3, said men.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III