Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 3 of 8 from 1860 edition -online book

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CLERK TAMAS.
351
" How do ye now, ye sweet Tamas ?                   <s
And how gaes a' in your countrie ? "
" m do better to you than ever I've done, Fair Annie, gin ye'll come an' see."
" O Guid forbid," said fair Annie,
" That e'er the like fa' in my hand;                to
Wou'd I forsake my ain gude lord,
And follow you, a gae-through-land ?
" Yet nevertheless now, sweet Tamas, Ye'll drink a cup o' wine wi' me;
And nine times in the live lang day,                   55
Your fair claithing shall changed be."
Fair Annie pat it till her cheek, Sae did she till her milk-white chin,
Sae did she till her flattering lips, But never a drap o' wine gaed in.                   eo
Tamas pat it till his cheek,
Sae did he till his dimpled chin; He pat it till his rosy lips,
And then the well o' wine gaed in.
" These pains," said he, " are ill to bide ; 65
Here is the day that I maun die; 0 take this cup frae me, Annie,
For o' the same I ain weary."
" And sae was I, o' you, Tamas,
When I was hunted to the sea;                        70
But I'se gar bury you in state,
Which is mair than ye'd done to me."







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III