Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 3 of 8 from 1860 edition -online book

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GKjEME AND BEWICK.
85
". 0 hald your tongue, my father dear, Of your prideful talking let me be!
Ye might hae drunken your wine in peace,
And let me and my billie be.                                  iso
" Gae dig a grave, baith wide and deep, And a grave to hald baith him and me ;
But lay Christie Grseme on the sunny side, For I'm sure he wan the victorie."
" Alack ! a wae ! " auld Bewick cried,                   15i
" Alack ! was I not much to blame ?
I'm sure Fve lost the liveliest lad That e'er was born unto my name."
" Alack ! a wae !" quo' gude Lord Graeme, " I'm sure I hae lost the deeper lack !                ieo
I durst hae ridden the Border through, Had Christie Grseme been at my back.
" Had I been led through Liddesdale,
And thirty horsemen guarding me, And Christie Graeme been at my back,                  iss
Sae soon as he had set me free !
" I've lost my hopes, I've lost my joy, I've lost the key but and the lock ;
I durst hae ridden the world round,
Had Christie Graeme been at my back." wo







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III