Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 3 of 8 from 1860 edition -online book

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THE WEARY COBLE 0' CARGILL.
From Motherwell's Minstrelsy, p. 230.
" This local ballad, which commemorates some real event, is given from the recitation of an old woman, residing in the neighbourhood of Cambus Michael, Perthshire. It possesses the elements of good poetry, and, had it fallen into the hands of those who make no scruple of interpolating and corrupting the text of oral song, it might have been made, with little trouble, a very interesting and pathetic composition.
" Kercock and Balathy are two small villages on the banks of the Tay; the latter is nearly opposite Stobhall. According to tradition, the ill-fated hero of the ballad had a leman in each of these places; and it was on the occasion of his paying a visit to his Kercock love, that the jealous dame in Balathy Toun, from a revenge­ful feeling, scuttled the boat in which he was to recross the Tay to Stobhall." Motherwell.
David Drumjxond's destinie,
Gude man o' appearance o' Cargill;
I wat his blude rins in the flude, Sae sair against his parents' will.