Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 2 of 8 from 1860 edition

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LADY DIAMOND.
Prom the Percy Society Publications, xvii. 71. The same in Buchan, ii. 206. The ballad is given in Sharpe's Ballad Book, under the title of Dysmal, and by Aytoun, Ballads of Scotland, 2d ed., ii. 173, under that of Lady Daisy. All these names are corruptions of Ghismonda, on whose well-known story (Decame-rone, iv. 1, 9) the present is founded. This piece and the next might better have been inserted at p. 347, as a part of the Appendix to Book IH.
There was a king, an' a curious king,
An' a king o' royal fame; He had ae dochter, he had never mair,
Ladye Diamond was her name.
She's fa'en into shame, an' lost her gude name, s
An' wrought her parents 'noy; An' a' for her layen her luve so low,
On her father's kitchen boy.
Ae uicht as she lay on her bed,
Just thinkin' to get rest,                                   io
Up it came her old father,
Just like a wanderin' ghaist.
" Rise up, rise up, ladye Diamond," he says,
" Rise up, put on your goun ; Rise up, rise up, ladye Diamond," he says, is
" Por I fear ye gae too roun'."