Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 2 of 8 from 1860 edition

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364
THE CKOODLIN DOO.
" She boiled it in a brass pan;                         m
O mak my bed, mammie, noo."
" And what did ye do wi' the banes o't,
My bonnie wee croodlin doo ? " "I gied them to my little dog;
Mak my bed, mammie, noo."                        20
" And what did your little doggie do,
My bonnie wee croodlin doo ? " " He streteh'd out his head, his feet, and dee'd,
And so will I, mammie, noo!"
II. THE" SNAKE-COOK.
From oral tradition, in Erk's Deutscher Leiderhort, p. 6. Our homely translation is, as far as possible, word for word. Other German versions are The Stepmother, at p. 5 of the same collection, (or Uhland, i. 272,) and Grandmother Adder-cook, at p. 7. The last is translated by Jamieson, Illustrations of Northern Antiquities, p. 320.
" Where hast thou been away so long,
Henry, my dearest son ? " "01 have been at my true-love's,
Lady mother, ah me! My young life,                                                   «
She has poisoned for me."
" What gave she thee to eat, Henry, my dearest son ? "







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