Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 2 of 8 from 1860 edition

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THE MILLER AND THE KING'S DAUGH­TER. See p. 231.
From Wit Restofd, (1658,) reprinted, London, 1817, i. 153. It is there ascribed to " Mr. Smith," (Dr. James Smith, the author of many of the pieces in that collection,) who may have written it down from tradi­tion, and perhaps added a verse or two. Mr. Rimbault has printed the same piece from a broadside dated 1656, in Notes and Queries, v. 591. A fragment of it is given from recitation at p. 316 of that volume, and a copy quite different from any before published, at p. 102 of vol. vi. Although two or three stanzas are ludicrous, and were probably intended for burlesque, this ballad is by no means to be regarded as a parody.
There were two sisters, they went a-playing, With a hie downe, downe, a downe a ;
To see their fathers ships sayling in. With a hy downe, downe, a downe o.
And when they came into the sea brym,
With, &c. The elder did push the younger in.
With, &c.
" O sister, O sister, take me by the gowne,
With, &c. And drawe me up upon the dry ground."
With, &c.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III