Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 2 of 8 from 1860 edition

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THE TWA BEOTHEES.
221
lin appearing to the editor, as "will be seen in the text, to be a mistake for a-wrestling, he took the liberty of altering it accordingly. After all, perhaps, the title may be right; and the wood may afterwards have ob­tained its denomination from the tragical event here celebrated. A very few lines inserted by the editor to fill up chasms, [some of which have been omittedj are inclosed in brackets; the text, in other respects, is given genuine, as it was taken down from the recita­tion of Mrs. Arrott." Jamikson.
" 0 will ye gae to the school, brother ?
Or will ye gae to the ba' ? Or will ye gae to the wood a-warslin,
To see whilk o's maun fa' ? "
" It's I winna gae to the school, brother ; «
Nor will I gae to the ba' ? But I will gae to the wood a-warslin ;
And it is you maun fa'."'
They warstled up, they warstled down, The lee-lang simmer's day;                       w
[And nane was near to part the strife, That raise atween them tway,
Till out and Willie's drawn his sword, And did his brother slay.]
" 0 lift me up upon your back ;                     ui
Tak me to yon wall fair;







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III