Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 2 of 8 from 1860 edition

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FAIK MARGARET AND SWEET WILLIAM. 141
the first distinction, as she had heard this song repeat­ed in her infancy."
The variations in Herd's copy, (i. 145,) and in Bit-son's (Ancient Songs, ii. 92,) are unimportant.
In the main the same is the widely known ballad, Der Hitter und das Magdlein, Erk, p. 81, Hoffmann's Schlesische Volkslieder, p. 9; Herr Malmstens Drbm, Svenska Folkvisor, iii. 104, Arwidsson, ii. 21; Volks­Ueder der Wenden, by Haupt and Schmaler, i. 159-162 (Hoffmann); in Dutch, with a different close, Hoffmann's Niederlandische Volkslieder, p. 61 : also Lord Lovel, post, p. 162.
As it fell out on a long summer's day,
Two lovers they sat on a hill; They sat together that long summer's day,
And could not talk their fill.
" I see no harm by you, Margaret,                     5
And you see none by mee ; Before to-morrow at eight o' the clock
A rich wedding you shall see."
Fair Margaret sat in her bower-window,
Combing her yellow hair ;                              10
There she spyed sweet "William and his bride, As they were a riding near.
Then down she layd her ivory combe,
And braided her hair in twain: She went alive out of her bower,                       is
But ne'er came alive in't again.







E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III