Child's, The English And Scottish Ballads

Volume 2 of 8 from 1860 edition

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CLERK SAUNDERS.
49
" Comfort weel your seven sons, For comforted will I never be:
I ween 'twas neither knave nor loon Was in the bower last night wi' me."—
PART SECOND.
The clinking bell gaed through the town, To carry the dead corse to the clay;
And Clerk Saunders stood at may Margaret's window, I wot, an hour before the day.
" Are ye sleeping, Margaret ? " he says, « '
" Or are ye waking presentlie ? Give me my faith and troth again,
I wot, true love, I gied to thee."—
" Your faith and troth ye sail never get, Nor our true love sail never twin,                10
Until ye come within my bower, And kiss me cheik and chin."—
" My mouth it is full cold, Margaret, It has the smell, now, of the ground ;
1. The custom of the passing bell is still kept np in many viDages in Scotland. The sexton goes through the town, ringing a small bell, and announcing the death of the de­parted, and the time of the funeral. Scott. VOL. II.                         4







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