A PEPYSIAN GARLAND - online book

Black-letter Broadside Ballads Of The years 1595-1639

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THE FRENCHMEN'S WONDER
the tune of My bleeding heart or Let's to the wars again. The latter is equivalent (cf. No. 73) to Maying Time (for which see Chappell's Popular Music, 1, 377), and to Maying Time the present ballad can readily be sung.
Relating that on the 26th. of Feb. last, about 9 in the morning were seen between Dole and Salins in France^ a most incredible number of Birds, who by their multitude darkened the Sky; after having for some time, as it were skirmished together in great confusion, they seperated into two bodies; and after most horrible cries, they en­gaged against each other with such fury, that several thousands were fain dead to the Earth; some smothered with most of their feathers off, and others all bloody and torn; These Birds were of a hundred several sorts, of several sizes, and several colours. Those which were most Numerous weighed four or five pounds a piece; their claws were like those of Indian Hens, Nibs crooked like Parrots, and their feathers of an Ash colour; about 500 Paces of Ground were covered with these dead carkasses to a mans height. Besides several Thousands that were found dispersed here and there: Insomuch that it being feared that the Air might be infected by them, Pioneers were sent from Dole to bury them.
To the tune of, In Summer time.
i COme give attention young and old, whilst in my story I proceed, Strange wonders dayly we behold, yet pass them over without heed.
2 From places strange, by Sea and Land, and from all parts beneath the Sun; Of wonders great we understand,
which by the Lord on high are done.
162
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