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Black-letter Broadside Ballads Of The years 1595-1639

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THE FAMOUS RAT-CATCHER
19   And to the Fayre in Smithfield,
he now is gon and paced: To search with Pole for the Rat-knawne hole that him so much outfaced.
And still doth he cry, a Rat, &c.
20   Now to the Tipling houses,
to kill the Vermine featly: French Rats and Mice all in a trice, he will destroy full neatly.
And still doth he cry, a Rat, &c.
21    An vgly Wench to see-to,
whose Nose was knawne with Vermin, The Ratte to kill, that vsd her ill, to vse him doth determine.
And still doth he cry, a Rat. &c.
22    If any other Maydens,
or Female kinds, will vse him, Come call him quicke, for with a tricke hee's gone, if you refuse him. And still doth he cry, a Rat, &c.
23   To Sturbridge Fayre his iourny
is plotted, and appoynted: Approch with speed, you that haue need with Poyson to be noynted. And still doth he cry, a Rat, &c.
24   When backe he commeth home-ward,
obserue his Flagge bepainted With Mice and Rattes, and with Poulcats, if you will be acquainted,
And heare him to cry, a Rat tat tat,
tara Rat, euer: To catch a Mouse, or to carouse, such a Ratter I saw neuer.
Imprinted at London for lohn Trundle, and are to be sold at the signe of the No-body in Barbican.
R.P.G.
65
E
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E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III