The Book Of Praise From The Best English Hymn Writers

450 Christian Songs & Hymns Selected & Arranged By Roundell Palmer

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Notes.
503
NOTES TO ADDITIONAL HYMNS.
HYMN
i.—I am indebted to the Rev. J. Kettle for permission, obtained through him, to introduce this and the other additional Hymns of the late Professor Joseph Anstice. The two numbered cclxxiii. and cccxxvn. I had previously taken from the Child's Christian Year; (in which the additional Hymn, No. 24, will also be found.) The collected hymns of the author have never been made public, though they were privately printed, after his death, in 1836.
v.—The first four out of five stanzas.
vii.—From Bishop Mant's Holy days of the Church, &c. vol. i. p. 360.
vni.—This is the original translation of Mr. Williams (omitting the last twelve lines), of which Hymn lxi. is a variation.
ix.—The text is that of the 58th Scotch Paraphrase; and, although differing from that given in Logan's works, may be regarded as altered by himself, or with his authority, from the original by Michael Bruce.
xii.—Five out of six stanzas (Olney Hymns, Book I. No. 53).
xiv.—This is No. 856 in Dr. Collyer's Hymn-Book of 1812. Dr. Collyer, in a note, states, that he is himself the author of the last three st;mzas, having never seen more than the first which (following a popular error) he assumes to be a trans­lation from Luther, by whose name it is usually called, and to one of whose tunes it is set and sung. The original German hymn, however, on which this is founded (beginning, " Esist gewisslich an der Zeit,") is not by Luther, but by Bartholo­mew Ringwald. I have not been able to discover the author of the first English stanza.
xvi. xvm.—These two popular hymns constitute parts of Dr. Neale's translation of The Rhythm of Bernard de Morlaix, Monk of Cluny, on the Celestial Country. (London : J. T. Hayes, 1862.) The entire translation is very long (442 lines). The Latin original begins with the line,
11 Hora novissivia, tempora pessima sunt, vigilemus."
xxi 1. xxx.—From Hymns from the Gospel of the Day for each Sun­day and the Festivals of our Lord, by the Rev. J. E. Bode. (Oxford and London : J. H. & J. Parker, 1860.)
xxvii.—I am indebted for this to the kindness of the translator.
xxxi.—The first four out of five stanzas. Olncy Hymns, Book I. No. 50.
xxxiv.—I am indebted for this to the author.






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