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306                      DICTIONARY OF RHYMES.
ADE*
persuade
pervade
relaid
tirade
unlade
upbraid
accolade
ambuscade
barricade
bastinade
cannonade
cavalcade
centigrade
colonnade
esplanade
Also the ay, ey, eigh, as
fusilade
gasconade
lemonade
marmalade
masquerade
overlade
palisade
pasquinade
renegade
retrograde
serenade
bad
bead
head
preterites of verbs in prey'd, sleigh'd.
aid
bade
blade
braid
cade
dadef
fade
glade
grade
hade \
jade
lade
made
maid
raid
shade
slade§
spade
trade
vade II
abraid
afraid
arcade
blockade
brigade
brocade
cascade
chamade
cockade
crusade
decade
degrade
dissuade
evade
facade
gambade ••
grenade
invade
milkmaid
parade
badge cadge
ADGE
fadge ft
• In genial spring beneath the quivering shade, Where curling vapours breathe along the mead.
Pope. Since when a boy, he plied his trade, Till on his life the sickness weigh'd.
R. Browning. Then to the still small voice I said; Let me not cast to endless shade, What is so wonderfully made.
Tennyson. f Obsolete. To lead, as a child just learning to walk ; to walk slowly or unsteadily, as a child just beginning to go alone.
No sooner taught to dade, than from their mother trip.—Drayton. J Obsolete. The descent of a hill.
On the lower lees, as on the higher hades, The dainty clover grows.—Drayton. § Obso ete. A flat low piece of ground ; a dale; a valley. Employed by Drayton.
|j Obsolete. To vanish ; to pass away ; to go hastily or rapidly. Em­ployed by Spenser.
*[ Obsolete. To arouse; to awake. Employed by Spenser. •• Obsolete. From gambado, a leather case attached to a stirrup; a cover for the leg worn over other clothing ; a gaiter. ff Obst lete. To be suitable; to suit; to fit.
Clothes I must get; this fashion will not fadge with me.
Beaumont and Fletcher. To live in concord or amity ; to agree.
They shall be made, spite of antipathy, to fadge together.—Milton. In Scotland it is still sometimes used, and is applied to a bundle of sticks; a covering of rough leather; a bannock.






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III