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Boogie Chord Progression
A typical blues chord progression, sometimes called the "boogie progression", involves playing a pattern of major, sixth and seventh chords tied together with a turnaround.
This is easy but it sounds really cool.
The first step is to strum each of the chords diagrammed below. We have a G, G6, G7 and another G6. Just strum them one time each.
G7 G6
After the G progression we move up the neck to C. Once again, just strum each of these chords once. C C6 C7 C6
And then we move up to D. D D6 D7 D6
Now that we know the chord forms involved, let's put together a boogie chord progression.
1.  Strum through the G, G6, G7 and C6 chords twice. Play this as a quarter note strum. In other words, each strum is counted for one beat.
2.  Strum through the C, C6, C7, C6 chords twice while keeping the quarter note strum.
3.  Strum through the G, G6, G7 and C6 chords twice.
4.  Strum through the D, D6, D7, D6 chord once.
5.  Strum through the C, C6, C7, C6 chords once.
6.  Strum through the G, G6, G7 and C6 chords twice.
Like I said, this is pretty easy, but it does sound kind of cool.
Let's look at the structure of this progression. Since we are playing it in the key of G our I chord is G, our IV chord is C and our V chord is D:
I I6 I7 I6 | I I6 I7 I6
IV  IV6 IV7 IV6 | IV IV6 IV7 IV6 I I6 I7 I6 | I I6 I7 I6
V  V6 V7 V6 | IV IV6 IV7 IV6 I I6 I7 I6 | I I6 I7 I6
Once you get used to the sound of this try it in a couple of other keys before we look at adding in a turnaround.
Turnarounds
A turnaround does just that. It turns a chord progression around and leads you back to the first line of the next verse or chorus.






E-Book - An Annotated Compendium of Old Time American Songs by James Alverson III